Meadowbrook Community Council

Supporting community spirit and creating a connected environment in NE Seattle's Meadowbrook community and surrounding neighborhoods.

Thornton Creek Natural Drainage System Project

Thornton Creek Natural Drainage System Project
click to download (pdf)

SPU is working on a project to install natural drainage systems in the Thornton Creek basin. These systems consist of shallow depressions in the public right-of-way, or “planter strip,” filled with deep-rooted plants and spongy soils that temporarily hold and clean polluted stormwater from streets and sidewalks. 

Why Thornton Creek? 

Stormwater picks up pollutants from streets— including oil, heavy metals, and fertilizers— and flows into the Seattle’s creeks through ditches or pipes. Thornton Creek is a salmon-bearing urban creek with degraded water quality, and SPU is performing this work to remove pollutants from the stormwater before it reaches the creek. 

What’s Happening Now? 

We completed our technical analysis of potential locations for the natural drainage systems, and the project team is starting the design phase of this project. Throughout 2019 and 2020, our team will be engaging residents near the project site locations to share more information and gather feedback. 

Stay in the Know 

For more information about the project, please visit www.seattle.gov/utilities/environment-and-conservation/ projects/thornton-natural-drainage 

You can also reach out to SPU Project Manager, Luis Ramirez, at luis.ramirez@seattle.gov.


Share your experiences with flooding and sewer backups 
Take our survey: go.participate.online/DSA1

Seattle Public Utilities is studying flooding in the drainage and wastewater systems. Information you and your neighbors share will help us understand where the system isn’t working and plan future upgrades. Please fill out our online survey. We are especially interested in hearing from you if you have experienced flooding or sewer backups, noticed flooding in the street or sidewalk in your neighborhood, or if you own a building/house in Seattle. If you’d like a paper survey, or to complete the survey over the phone, please call (206) 274-4944. After filling out the survey, you can enter into a raffle to recieve one of several gift card prizes. 

What if I have problems now? 
  • For emergencies, call 911 
  • If you experience sewer backups or bad flooding during a storm, call our 24/7 Emergency Services line at (206) 386-1800 
  • For non-urgent plugged storm drains, use our online drain report by visiting www.seattle. gov/utilities/services/drainage-and-sewer; a crew member will respond in 3-5 business days 

Meadowbrook Pond Facility Rehabilitation Project

 Meadowbrook Pond Facility Rehabilitation Project 
click to download flyer (pdf)

 Meadowbrook Pond is a Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) stormwater detention and flood control facility located at 35th Ave NE, between NE 105th and 110th streets. It provides multiple stormwater benefits, including flood reduction, water quality improvement, sediment removal, and habitat improvement for Thornton Creek. In addition, Meadowbrook Pond provides wildlife habitat and open space. 

 What’s happening now? 

 In September 2018, SPU completed partial in-water removal of sediment from Meadowbrook Pond. This summer, SPU contractor crews are scheduled to perform dredging work in the southwest portion of the pond where most of the sediment accumulates. Crews are expected to begin mobilizing as early as late May, and in-water construction for this project is permitted from early July through September. Dredging is expected to take less than that time, and site restoration should be complete by the end of the summer. SPU will update the community about project schedule and anticipated construction impacts. 

SPU also plans to dredge Lake City Pond, which is another stormwater detention and flood control facility located near NE 125th St and 35th Ave NE. This work will help reduce sediment in Thornton Creek upstream from Meadowbrook Pond. 

*Note, schedule is subject to change due to permitting and other factors. 

 Stay in the Know 

 For more information about the project and to sign up for the project email list, please visit: 

www.seattle.gov/utilities/environment-and-conservation/projects/meadowbrook-pond-facility-rehabilitation 

You can also reach out to SPU Project Manager, Jonathan Brown, at jonathan.brown@seattle.gov.


Share your experiences with flooding and sewer backups 

Take our survey: go.participate.online/DSA1

Seattle Public Utilities is studying flooding in the drainage and wastewater systems. Information you and your neighbors share will help us understand where the system isn’t working and plan future upgrades. Please fill out our online survey. We are especially interested in hearing from you if you have experienced flooding or sewer backups, noticed flooding in the street or sidewalk in your neighborhood, or if you own a building/house in Seattle. If you’d like a paper survey, or to complete the survey over the phone, please call (206) 274-4944. After filling out the survey, you can enter into a raffle to recieve one of several gift card prizes. 

What if I have problems now? 
  • For emergencies, call 911 
  • If you experience sewer backups or bad flooding during a storm, call our 24/7 Emergency Services line at (206) 386-1800 
  • For non-urgent plugged storm drains, use our online drain report by visiting www.seattle. gov/utilities/services/drainage-and-sewer; a crew member will respond in 3-5 business days 

Thornton Creek Alliance General Meeting October 24

click to download flyer (PDF)

Dr. David Montgomery, PhD.

Professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington presents:

Growing a Revolution: Soil, Water, and Society: How restoring health to degraded soils can dramatically improve and sustain the quality of surface and ground water resources while also providing better profits for farmers and improving the overall health of society.

Dr. Montgomery is the author of five books, including Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life; The Hidden Half of Nature: The Microbial Roots of Life and Health; and King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon.

6:00 PM Social / 6:30 to 8:30 PM General Meeting

Maple Leaf Lutheran Church
10005 32nd AVE NE
Seattle, WA 98125

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

thornton-creek-alliance.org
facebook.com/thornton.creek.alliance

For questions about the meeting contact Dan Keefe at: papadan44@gmail.com.

Meadowbrook Pond Project Update – – August 24, 2018

Good Day,

I wanted to provide you with an update about construction on the Meadowbrook Pond Rehabilitation Project.

The contractor mobilized on the site, installed the stream bypass, and began work in the forebay and cell 1.

On August 21, 2018, the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 302 called for an immediate economic stand down (i.e. a strike). Until this is resolved, the strike is impacting construction on the Meadowbrook Pond Rehabilitation Project. For information on this topic, visit http://www.iuoe302.org/.

We will continue to monitor the situation. Following the Labor Day Holiday, I will share an update about the strike and the project schedule.

Regards,
Jonathan Brown
Project Manager
Seattle Public Utilities
jonathan.brown@seattle.gov

MEADOWBROOK POND IS NOW CLOSED FOR MAINTENANCE PROJECT

Message From Jonathan Brown of Seattle Public UtilitiesSeal of the City of Seattle

Dear Community Member,

We have kept the Meadowbrook Pond open as long as possible while we worked with the contractor to finalize pre-construction activities.

As of July 30, the Meadowbrook Pond will be closed for about 3 months so SPU contractor crews can remove accumulated sediment from the pond. Typical work hours will be Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with possible evening and weekend work.

The perimeter path along 39th Avenue N.E. and N.E. 105th Street will remain open with intermittent disruption to allow for vehicle crossing. In addition, we worked with the contractor to also provide access to the footbridge via the path off 35th Avenue N.E. However, the rest of the site will be closed throughout much of construction for safety and security reasons.

We are continuing to work with our Urban Ecosystems team to monitor wildlife on the site. Last week, an SPU biologist marked the location of a green heron nest and coordinated with Washington State Fish and Wildlife to develop guidance for the construction team on ways to avoid impacting the area around the nest.

I will share updates throughout construction via this email list and the (project website). Thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as we perform this necessary maintenance work.

Regards,
Jonathan Brown
Project Manager
Seattle Public Utilities
jonathan.brown@seattle.gov

Preparing for work on Meadowbrook Pond Rehabilitation Project

Dear Community Member,

SPU’s contractor is now onboard, and we are working with them on final preparations for the sediment removal project at Meadowbrook Pond. We plan to keep the pond open until they are ready to begin work, which will be the week of July 9th at the earliest.

Once work begins, Meadowbrook Pond will be closed for about 3 months. In-water work will be completed by the end of September with clean-up, demobilization, and site restoration extending into mid-October. Typical work hours will be Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

While most of the site will be closed for safety and security reasons as well as to enable the contractor to adequately stage equipment and efficiently remove sediment from the site, the perimeter pathway will remain open throughout much of construction with some intermittent closures.

Meadowbrook Community Council

Meadowbrook Community Council

We have heard from the community, and we know that the beavers and other wildlife are important. In preparation for construction, SPU coordinated with Washington State Fish and Wildlife and other agencies to identify an optimal time period for construction that will have the least affect fish and other aquatic life (also known as a “fish window”). In addition, environmental analysts from SPU’s Urban Ecosystems group are continuing to evaluate the site to minimize our impacts on wildlife during construction. Continue reading